Introducing: Omega2

Arduino Dock Initial Setup

Last edited by greenbreakfast, 2016-06-01 19:43:45

Before you can get started with the Arduino Dock, there are a few thigns that need to be done on your computer and then on the Arduino Dock.

These steps will only need to be carried out once, and then you'll be set to go.

Computer setup

These steps ensure the Omega and Arduino Dock will be detected wirelessly and correctly work with your computer.

Accessing the Omega's URL

The Omega must be accessible via its URL http://omega-ABCD.local where ABCD is your Omega's unique code.

The requirements vary depending on your Operating System:

Operating System Actions Required
Windows Install Apple's Bonjour Service
OS X Nothing, good to go
Linux Zeroconf services should already be installed, should be ok

Arduino IDE

Installation

Install the latest Arduino IDE from the good folks over at Arduino. We did all of our testing using Version 1.6.6.

Modification of boards.txt

The regular Arduino Uno has no way of communicating with your computer via WiFi, but the Omega provides the Arduino Dock with a means of wireless communication, so we'll have to let the Arduino software know! This requires a one line addition to the boards.txt file in your Arduino IDE installation.

Open the boards.txt file in any text editor. The following table outlines where the boards.txt file can be found:

Operating System Location of boards.txt
OS X /Applications/Arduino.app/Contents/Java/hardware/arduino/avr/boards.txt
Windows C:\Program Files (x86)\Arduino\hardware\arduino\avr\boards.txt

Once it's open, add the following line:

uno.upload.via_ssh=true
Doesn't matter where you add it, you can nestle it with the other uno. settings if you like.

Installation of Onion Arduino Library

The Onion Arduino Library provides the required setup and functions required for the Arduino Dock to operate correctly.

Installing the library

Follow these steps to install the library:

  • Download and install the Adafruit Neopixel Library using these instructions
  • Download the latest Onion Arduino Library zip to your computer
  • Open the Arduino IDE
    • Open the Sketch Menu, and then Include Library -> Add .ZIP Library Add library
    • Navigate to where the Onion Arduino Library zip was downloaded
    • Select Onion-Arduino-Library.zip
  • The library is now installed, it can be included in your sketches by opening the Sketch menu -> Include Library -> Onion

Arduino Dock Setup

The ATmega chip on the Arduino Dock needs to be burned with a new bootloader to work with the Omega properly. This only has to be done once and your Arduino Dock will be good to go. The new bootloader allows the ATmega to be flashed via the I2C connection with the Omega. There are a few methods to flash the bootloader, they are outlined below.

Using the Omega + Expansion Dock as a Programmer

The Omega can actually be used to program the bootloader

Required Components

  • An Omega
  • An Expansion Dock
  • The target Arduino Dock
  • Six jumper wires (male-to-male)
    • Can just be six pieces of wire with the insulation stripped off at the end

Wiring

Plug the Omega into the Expansion Dock and allow it to boot. The Expansion Dock ports need to be connected to specific Arduino Dock ports for the programming to work.

Follow the table below to wire the Omega to the Arduino Dock. Note that it's very important that the Omega and the Arduino Dock share a common ground!

Function Expansion Dock GPIO Arduino Dock Pin
SPI MISO 1 12
SPI SCK 6 13
SPI RESET 7 Reset
SPI MOSI 19 11
VCC 5V 5V
GND GND GND

Programmer Connections Programmer Connections with Power

Provide power to the Omega and Expansion Dock through the micro usb port.

Programming

First install the Onion Arduino Dock software package:

opkg update
opkg install arduino-dock

On the Omega's terminal and run the following command:

sh /usr/bin/arduino-dock flash bootloader

Unless there were errors in the programming sequence, the Arduino Dock should now have the Bootloader installed and the amber LED next to the DC connector should be flickering.

Summary

Once this is complete, the extra wires and the Expansion Dock are no longer required! Check out the guide on using the Arduino Dock for what to do next.

Resolving Issues

If the amber LED on the Arduino Dock is not flickering after the bootloader upload or if you experience issues flashing sketches, try the ICSP bootloader flashing method described in the section below.

Using the Omega + Expansion Dock with the Arduino Dock ICSP Header

If the method described above does not successfully flash the Bootloader, try this slightly modified method. The ICSP Header provides direct SPI communication with the ATmega chip, allowing for programming regardless of how the ATmega pins are setup.

Required Components

  • An Omega
  • An Expansion Dock
  • The target Arduino Dock
  • Two male-to-male jumper wires
  • Four male-to-female jumper wires

Wiring

Plug the Omega into the Expansion Dock and allow it to boot.

Provide power to the Arduino Dock by connecting the 5V and GND Expansion Dock GPIOs to the Arduino Dock 5V and GND pins with jumper wires.

GPIOs 1, 6, 7, and 19 from the Expansion Dock need to be connected to the ICSP Header on the Arduino Dock using male-to-female jumper wires. Follow the image and table below:

Arduino Dock ICSP Header Pinout

Expansion Dock GPIO ICSP Pin
1 MISO
6 SCK
7 RESET
19 MOSI

Arduino Dock ICSP Plugged in

Power the Omega and Expansion Dock through the micro usb port.

Omega + Exp Dock + Arduino Dock + ICSP

Programming

First install the Onion Arduino Dock software package:

opkg update
opkg install arduino-dock

Connect to the Omega's terminal and run the following command:

sh /usr/bin/arduino-dock flash bootloader
Unless there were errors in the programming sequence, the Arduino Dock should now have the Bootloader installed and the amber LED next to the DC connector should be flickering.

Summary

Once this is complete, the extra wires and the Expansion Dock are no longer required! Check out the guide on using the Arduino Dock for what to do next.

Using the Omega + Mini Dock as a Programmer

The Mini Dock can be used in place of an Expansion Dock if you do not have access to one. This process is a little more 'hacky' and we recommend using an Expansion Dock if at all possible, proceed with caution and at your own risk!

Required Components

  • An Omega
  • A Mini Dock
  • The target Arduino dock
  • Six pieces of wire with insulation stripped off the ends
    • Stranded wire works best

Wiring

Disconnect the Omega from the Mini Dock. Put a wire into each of the pins shown below:

Mini Dock Port drawing Mini Dock wire connections

When using stranded wire, you'll need to twist the ends to make it easier to plug in.

With the wires in place, plug the Omega into the Mini Dock, ensuring that the wires are into the Mini Dock's headers by the Omega's pins. It will take more pressure than usual to plug the Omega in since the pins need to squish in with the wires, be careful to not break anything! Stranded wires work well since the strands have some mobility and can accomodate the pin. Allow the Omega to boot.

Omega + Mini Dock + Wires side view Omega + Mini Dock + Wires top view

Now connect the wires to the Arduino Dock ports specified below:

Function Mini Dock Pin Arduino Dock Pin
SPI MISO 1 12
SPI SCK 6 13
SPI RESET 7 Reset
SPI MOSI 19 11
VCC 3.3V 3V3
GND GND GND

Omega + Mini Dock + Arduino Dock connections

Programming

First install the Onion Arduino Dock software package:

opkg update
opkg install arduino-dock

Connect to the Omega's terminal and run the following command:

sh /usr/bin/arduino-dock flash bootloader
Unless there were errors in the programming sequence, the Arduino Dock should now have the Bootloader installed and the amber LED next to the DC connector should be flickering.

Summary

Once this is complete, the extra wires and the Mini Dock are no longer required! Check out the guide on using the Arduino Dock for what to do next.

Using an Arduino as a Programmer

Stil working on this one, stay tuned!