Introducing: Omega2

Using the OLED Expansion

Last edited by greenbreakfast, 2016-07-13 18:48:06

The OLED Expansion allows you to display images and text on the small black and white OLED Display. It can be used to display project status, sensor info, or other information from the Omega, allowing you to have data from the digital world displayed in the real world!

Omega+OLED Expansion

The Hardware

The OLED Expansion has a 0.96" 128x64 black and white OLED display. When displaying text, there are 8 rows, with 21 possible characters in each row.

Using the OLED Expansion

Make sure that your Omega has the latest firmware!

On the command line, a tool called oled-exp will be your helper in all things related to the OLED Expansion.

Also available are a C library and Python module that will allow you to create your own programs that use the OLED Expansion.

Command Usage

For a print-out of the command's usage, run it with just a -h argument

oled-exp -h

In general, the commands will be in this form:

oled-exp [OPTIONS] COMMAND PARAMETER

Programming Flow

When it is first powered on, the OLED Expansion must first be programmed with an initialization sequence in order to accept further commands.

After the initialization, it can accept a series of commands to do the following:

  • clear the display
  • turn it on and off (while preserving the image)
  • invert the display colours
  • dim the brightness
  • set the text cursor to a particular position
  • write a message
  • enable horizontal or diagonal scrolling
  • display an image

A single oled-exp call can have one or many cascaded commands:

// single command
oled-exp write "Hello!"

// multiple cascaded commands (execute in order from left to right)
oled-exp write "Onion Omega\nMy favourite" dim on cursor 4,0 write ":)"

Command and Option Table

To reconcile all of the above features to oled-exp, refer to the table below:

Action Option/Command
initialization -i
clear the display -c
toggle display on or off power <on|off>
invert colours invert <on|off>
dim the screen dim <on|off>
set the cursor cursor <row>,<column>
set the cursor by pixel cursorPixel <row>,<pixel>
write text write <string>
write a single byte writeByte <byte>
enable scrolling scroll <direction>
display an image draw <lcd file>

Options

The option arguments can be run by themselves or in conjunction with any other command. They will always be executed first.

Initialization

To initialize the display to accept further commands:

// just initialize the display
oled-exp -i 	

// initialize the display and write a message
oled-exp -i write "Freshly initialized"

Clear the Screen

To clear the screen and set the cursor to the top left:

// just clear the screen
oled-exp -c

// clear the screen and draw an image
oled-exp -c draw /root/onion.lcd

Commands

The commands are more complex and each requires one argument.

Power

Turn the display on or off. Can be used to toggle the display after it has been initialized.

oled-exp power <on|off>

Note that any text or images on the screen will be preserved.

Invert

Invert black and white on the display. Setting to on will enable the invert, setting to off will disable the inversion.

oled-exp invert <on|off>

Dim

Enable dimming the display. Setting to on will dim the display, setting to off will restore the default brightness.

oled-exp dim <on|off>

Write

Write a string to the display at the current position of the cursor:

oled-exp write <string>

If the string contains spaces or any special characters (newlines, !?(){}[] etc), it needs to be wrapped with double quotes:

oled-exp write "This is so exciting!\nIsn't it?!?!\n\n(I love the Omega)"

A list outlining the supported characters can be found in a section below.

Write a Single Byte

Write a single byte of data (eight vertical pixels) to the display at the current position of the cursor:

oled-exp writeByte <byte>

The Least Significant Bit (LSB) in the byte corresponds to the top-most pixel in the column, the Most Significant Bit (MSB) corresponds to the bottom-most pixel in the column.

The cursor will be incremented to the next pixel column after this command.

For example, the following command:

oled-exp writeByte 0x0f

Will fill in the top four pixels and will leave the bottom four pixels in a column blank.

Set the Cursor Position

Set the cursor position on the display, any writes after this command will start at the specified row and column.

The row parameter represents each character row (8 pixel rows) on the display, so the range is 0 to 7

The column parameter represents each character column, the range is 0 to 20

oled-exp cursor <row>,<column>

Examples

To write Hello on the first line, and then How are you? on the 4th row:

oled-exp write Hello cursor 3,0 write "How are you?"

Set the cursor to the start of the last character row:

oled-exp cursor 7,0

Set the cursor to the middle of the 2nd row:

oled-exp cursor 2,10

Set the Cursor Position by Pixel Column

Set the cursor position on the display, any writes after this command will start at the specified row and pixel.

The row parameter represents each character row (8 pixel rows) on the display, so the range is 0 to 7

The pixel parameter represents each pixel column, the range is 0 to 127

oled-exp cursorPixel <row>,<pixel>

Examples

To write Hello a quarter of the way through the first line, and then How are you? in the middle of the 4th row:

oled-exp cursorPixel 0,31 write Hello cursorPixel 3,63 write "How are you?"

Set the cursor to the start of the last character row:

oled-exp cursorPixel 7,0

Set the cursor to the middle of the 2nd row:

oled-exp cursorPixel 2,63

Scrolling

The OLED can scroll whatever is on the screen horizontally or diagonally upwards. The text/image will wrap around the edges.

oled-exp scroll <direction>

Supported directions:

  • left
  • right
  • diagonal-left
  • diagonal-right
  • stop
    • To disable scrolling

left scroll

diagonal-right scroll

Displaying Images

Drawing Images on the Display

The OLED Screen can also be used to display images. The Console can be used to convert existing images into a format that is compatible with the OLED Expansion and save the output to an Omega. Functions in the C library can read the image data and display it on the OLED Expansion. Alternatively, a buffer can be created programatically and displayed on the OLED.

Creating Image Files

The Console OLED App can be used to create OLED Expansion compatible image files. Navigate to the Image tab of the OLED App:

OLED Console App Image Tab

Once an image has been selected, a button and form will appear that allow you to save the OLED image file to your Omega:

OLED Console App Loaded Image

After the image name and location are selected, click the Save to Omega button.

OLED Image File Details

The OLED image files store the image data as 1024 bytes represented in hexadecimal. Each byte represents eight vertical pixels, with the first 128 bytes representing the columns in Page 0, the following 128 bytes representing the columns in Page 1, and so on.

If this is unclear, see the Understanding the Display Section in the OLED Expansion Library documentation article for details on how the display is addressed.

Displaying Images from a File

To display the OLED image file on the OLED Expansion:

oled-exp draw <path to oled image file>

Example

Draw an image saved to /root/image.lcd on the display:

oled-exp draw /root/image.lcd

Initialize the display and draw an image saved to /tmp/onion.lcd:

oled-exp -i draw /tmp/onion.lcd

Supported Characters

The OLED Display supports the following characters:

  • SPACE
  • !
  • "
  • #
  • $
  • %
  • &
  • '
  • (
  • )
  • *
  • +
  • ,
  • -
  • .
  • /
  • 0
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g
  • h
  • i
  • j
  • k
  • l
  • m
  • n
  • o
  • p
  • q
  • r
  • s
  • t
  • u
  • v
  • w
  • x
  • y
  • z
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • X
  • Y
  • Z
  • :
  • ;
  • <
  • =
  • >
  • ?
  • @
  • [
  • \
  • ]
  • ^
  • _
  • `
  • {
  • |
  • }
  • ~

Using the Libraries

The C library and Python module will give you the flexibility to use the OLED Expansion however you want in your own programs.

For more information, see this guide.